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Showing posts from October, 2008

Vote Early

Today my family and I voted early. We waited in line for about two and half hours, which wasn't bad. I am assuming we saved a lot of time compared to how much time we would have spent in line on November 4th. In line I brought cheese and dip, candy, and a word puzzle. We got a little break because my sister brought her child, so that scooted us up in the line a little bit. The actual voting process was easy with the card and touch screen service. Voting early is only way to do it, I'll make it a habit in the future.

For the 2000 election, I also voted early because I volunteered as a poll worker. I had a good experience but the service literally took all day, which made me tired at the end of the day. We worked from about six in the morning until 9pm.

I strongly encourage you to vote, and I go further to say do it early it will save you a lot time.

Closer to Recovery

Yesterday I visited a college and gathered information on the requirements for spring admission. The deadline for spring admission is mid-November. I plan on applying to the school, and the whole idea of returning to school excites me. It shows progress in my recovery. I look forward to starting school in January and being enrolled part-time for starts. My major is Business Administration.

Prior to the onset of schizophrenia I was going to school, working, and running cross country. But when schizophrenia interrupted my life it snatched away everything. Now I am slowly picking up the activities I used to do and going to school is a major part of that. Recovery is feeling like your old self again, and when I am in school I will feel like the old me again.

Schizophrenia and Diabetes

Approximately 18 percent of people living with schizophrenia have type 2 diabetes. People with schizophrenia have a life expectancy 20 percent shorter than the general population- and they have two to four times a greater risk of developing diabetes than the general population.

Risk Factors for Diabetes
Body mass index of >25
First-degree relative with diabetes
Habitual physical inactivity
Being an African American, Hispanic American, Native American, Asian American, or Pacific Islander
Delivering a baby >9lbs., or having had gestational diabetes
Hypertension, a high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level of <35mg/dl>250mg/dL
A history of an abnormal glucose tolerance or fasting plasma glucose test result
A history of vascular disease
Obesity is a risk factor for diabetes, and almost all anti psychotic drugs, including the older drugs, increase the risk of obesity. "Meta-analysis found that patients receiving standard doses of atypical antipsychotics for 10 weeks gained a mean o…

My Name is Mental Illness (A Poem)

Exact from poem published by the Association for Pastoral Care in Mental Health Newsletter. In honor of Mental Illness Awareness Week (MIAW) I found this poem online from the Jewish Association for the Mentally Ill (JAMI), U.K. (http://www.jamiuk.org/).

(Untitled)
My name is mental illness
I have been around since man was created
Many different names have been given to me
In the past - Loony, Nutter, Village Idiot, and so forth were used by
society.
To describe WHO I AM
In modern times - I have become sophisticated.
I am now labelled Depressive, Manic, Obsessive, Schizophrenic.
By people who have not lived with me.
To know me, and my capabilities.
You have a life that you think you own.
But I would like to remind you.
When I strike I pay no regard to who you are.
Or what you have achieved in society.
I take you Rich or Poor.
I take you Young or Old.
I take you Beautiful or Ugly regardless of colour or creed

Bipolar Disorder Awareness Day/National Depression Screening Day (NDSD) 2008

Mental Illness Awareness Week (MIAW) which will be held October 5-11, 2008 is a time to educate oneself and others about mental illnesses in order to overcome the stigma attached to mental illnesses. Bipolar Disorder Awareness Day and National Depression Screening Day is a part of MIAW.

Bipolar Disorder Awareness Day is Thursday, October 9, 2008. Bipolar disorder affects 6 million Americans.

National Depression Screening Day takes place Friday, October 10, 2008. Depression affects 19 million Americans or 9.5 percent of the population. To locate a screening site in your neighborhood click on the following website:
http://register.mentalhealthscreening.org/Locator1.aspx?MPEID=2

For an online assessment of either bipolar disorder or depression go to:
https://www.mentalhealthscreening.org/screening/select_screening.asp

MIAW Events-Charolettesvill, Sioux Falls, Tuscan

Several events are taking place this week in honor of Mental Illness Awareness Week (MIAW) that is held October 5-11, 2008. Sioux Falls, Charolettesvill and Tuscan among many other cities are celebrating MIAW. Go to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) website at http://www.nami.org for information about events taking place in your area.

Today, October 5, 2008 Sioux Falls, South Dakota will host the free 16th Annual Candle Light Vigil and Walk at First Lutheran Church (12th Street and Minnesota Avenue) at 6pm in Christ the Victor Chapel. The program will begin with prayer and scripture followed by speakers and music at 6:30. There is an optional eight-block candlelight walk (http://argusleader.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080922/UPDATES/80922026).

National Day of Prayer for Mental Illness Awareness Recovery and Understanding is Tuesday, October 7, 2008. Thomas Jefferson Memorial Church is hosting a prayer service from noon to 12:30pm in Charolettesvill (http://www.dailypro…

Mental Illness Awareness Week (MIAW)

This week is Mental Illness Awareness Week (October 5-October 11, 2008). In 1990 The United States Congress named the first week of October Mental Illness Awareness Week. National Day of Prayer fo Mental Illness Awareness Recovery and Understanding is Tuesday, October 7, 2008; Bipolar Disorder Awareness Day (BDAD) is held on the Thursday, October 9, 2008; National Depression Screening Day is Friday, October 10, 2008 of Mental Illness Awareness Week. Go to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) website and contact your local NAMI group to see what activities are taking place this week in your neigborhood at http://www.nami.org/. "According to the National Institute for Mental Health, today there are approximately thirty-five million persons who suffer the burdens of some form of mental illness. Twelve million are children. Ten million have chronic mental illness" (http://www.abc-usa.org/resources/resol/mentill.htm).

Assisted Outpatient Treament (AOT)

In this post I plan to discuss the reasons why involuntary medication compliance is needed in the community and safe for the mentally ill patient.

Forty-two states have what is called "Assisted Outpatient Treatment (AOT)," or "outpatient commitment" which is Court-ordered medication compliance (http://www.psychlaws.org/BriefingPapers/BP4.htm).

"What is a Petition for Assisted Outpatient Treatment: A mentally ill individual who does not comply with his/her treatment plan can deteriorate, lose the ability to make rational decisions, and become dangerous in the future. After a petition is filed, a hearing is set where a Judge would be able to order an individual into treatment Assisted Outpatient Treatment - if he/she demonstrates noncompliance" (http://www.oakgov.com/probate/faq/assist-outpatient-trtmt.html).

'Assisted Outpatient Treatment (AOT) has been known to reduce hospitalizations, arrests and incarceration, homelessness, violent episodes, and victim…

Continuous vs. Intermittent Medication

Hektiklyfe (http://thesilentpodium.blogspot.com/) asked an interesting question:

"So this is something you have to do the rest of your life or does (schizophrenia) go away after years of treatment?...and if you have to take those drugs for the rest of your life wouldn't you have to increase the dosage as time goes on?"

This was my response:
This a gray area because some people may not need treatment after many years (Surviving Schizophrenia A Family Manual). But for the majority of us we will need treatment for the rest of our lives. There is no cure for schizophrenia, it can be compared to diabetes in that we need medication to help us get by for our entire lives. And as time goes by usually the dose will decrease (Surviving Schizophrenia A Family Manual).

E. Fuller Torrey, M.D., author of Surviving Schizophrenia A Family Manual, said 'that people can stop medication until symptoms return. However, it is not clear which patients can do this without serious relapses. He …