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Goals vs. Limited Time

Because the year [2017] is closing, I am going to start preparing to my mindset, spirituality, finances, and miscellaneous needs; and overall wellness, today. I have many goals, in fact, I always have a goal. I like to check off my goals like a grocery list. Most times I categorize goals by dividing them into short-term (1-6 months), or long-term (6 months-2 years), phases and deadline to meet.

For example, here are a few of my goals:
CPS, Author,
Resource Coordinator & Trainer
  • To master punctuality; to be at work, and events earlier, in order, to reduce anxieties and stress.
  • To wake up earlier at least twice a week in order to gives thanks to God, journal, and to prepare my mindset for the day.
  • I am going to look into getting more certifications as a peer counselor, and trainer.
  • I will be more attentive to others, and will reduce offering feedback, because I need more information, and I enjoy lively conversations, everyday. 
However, I have a longer list than that, but I could prioritize my lists by focusing on two goals each week.

Unfortunately, this year has been an ongoing struggle. I loss much including my car, friend, and almost my ability to manage my depression among other conditions. In fact, I quit my job on my own, of almost two years, because I was in therapy, or my doctor's office weekly. My anxiety was severe to the extent that I left work early often such as twice a week. And I did try to overcome my anxiety by walking around my workplace, listening to music, journal, talking to a coworker, and keeping my mental health appointments.

Charlene Flagg, CEO Matters of the Heart
I quit my job due to my mental illness, ahead of time so that I would not seem incompetent, which could've become a byproduct of my symptoms of depression, and anxiety. I quit my job in January 2017. This year has educated me a lot on how to walk alone when one doesn't want to for personal time with self, focus, and to be mindful of negativity that can disrupt daily goals.

Finally, I will try to stay focused on the good things, such as completing two books...

  • Out of the Darkness: Faces of Mel Illness and Recovery, Revealed, co-authored by Ashley Smith, CPS, Angela B. Franklin, and Charlene Flag.... (Coming soon!)
  • What's On My Mind? Vol.II (Coming soon!)

Below is a brief biography of the women I am co-authoring the book with,  Out of the Darkness:

Angela B. Franklin is a survivor of a traumatic past—having survived childhood abuse, suicide attempts, and self-harming; among her own stigma, shame, and secrets. Furthermore, Angela is a two-time breast cancer survivor, initially diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer in 2013. Angela was diagnosed with depression (1977), borderline personality (1984), and post-traumatic stress disorder (1988). Despite years of shame and silence, Angela triumphs and shares her process of recovery, self-confidence, and love for her God that she had concerns with because of her traumatic experiences. Now for the first time Angela reveals several rough years of suffering in silence, and learning how to cope. The harsh experiences of her past transformed her into working as a Certified Peer Specialist (CPS). 

Angela graduated from Huntingdon College (Bachelor of Arts, Biology). After being unable to maintain employment due to severe persistent mental illness she worked for Job Corps Center for 15 years. Angela has an extensive background working with at risk youth (ages 13-24) with severe behavioral concerns. Pursuing her passion she started her own business, Crafty Treasures by Angela, in 2012. Instructing youth, senior citizens and others in diverse arts and crafts workshops that may include: pottery, jewelry-making, and crocheting among a host of other crafts, and such. Now a CPS, Angela supports peers by encouraging them to partake in self-directed recovery initiatives. Angela openly shares her past shame, silence, and faith in this collaboration, Out of the Darkness: Faces of Mental Illness & Recovery Revealed. Still she fights, still she prays, and thus, still Angela lives in recovery! 

Charlene Flagg is a licensed Therapist with over 20 years of experience in Direct Practice, Administration, Research and Teaching at the College-level.  Charlene graduated from the University of Georgia with a Masters Degree in Social Work, and also earned a Masters Degree in Sociology from the University of Michigan as a scholarship recipient.  She is currently pursuing a Master of Divinity Degree at Emory University, also as a scholarship recipient.  Charlene recently began her own private practice, Matters of the Heart Counseling Services, LLC. 

Charlene is highly proficient with rendering diagnoses and providing psycho-therapeutic intervention for individuals diagnosed with severe and persistent mental illness.  Her areas of specialization include: Depressive Disorders, Anxiety Disorders, Bipolar Disorders, Trauma, and Psychotic Disorders.  She is adept with Cognitive Behavior Therapy, Dialectical Behavior Therapy, Solution Focused Therapy, and Crisis Intervention.  

Ashley Smith is a writer, speaker, and peer counselor. Ashley Smith self-published her first book, What’s On My Mind? A Collection Of Blog Entries From Overcoming Schizophrenia, (2014). Ashley Smith’s book debut, What’s On My Mind? was endorsed by the Georgia Mental Health Consumer Network, Inc. (GMHCN). The GMHCN endorsed Smith’s book by distributing a copy to each attendee free of charge. At their annual conference. “The Year of the Peer,” (2014) which was that year’s theme featured Ashley Smith as one of three keynote speakers. In addition to that Georgia’s prison system supports Smith’s book by having placed a copy in each state prison facility across the state!

In 2007, Ashley learned that she had schizophrenia at the age of 20 through a significant legal incident and arrest. Anonymously, Ashley began writing her story on her blog, “Overcoming Schizophrenia,” starting in 2008. Ashley publicly disclosed her life-changing experience with mental illness on her blog. When the online mental health community learned of her self-disclosed story they quickly embraced her. One of the many individuals who embraced Ashley was Christina Bruni. Bruni, a fellow peer who is a journalist, librarian, blogger, and author of Left of the Dial, wrote the foreword to Ashley’s book, What’s On My Mind?

In 2012, Ashley became a Georgia Certified Peer Specialist (CPS). A CPS is a peer counselor that is certified by the state of Georgia’s DBHDD and the Georgia Mental Health Consumer Network, Inc. CPS Project, which developed the new mental health position, the CPS.



Eseosa Osagiede said…
Jesus loves you put ur trust in him he is your saviour and can help you no matter what you’re facing!!
Briona Kennedy said…
NATURAL CURE TO MENTAL ILLNESS: I’m so appreciative for this type of platform, it gives us all opportunity to openly share our experiences without fear of shame. It is no longer a news that there is permanent cure to schizophrenia. My daughter was diagnosed of schizophrenia 15 years ago, over those time, I spent more time in hospital than out of hospital without much improvement. It was difficult and humbling, she had a major breakthrough only with CONSUMMO treatment. We're so proud that we've done it all to save her, She now think more clearly. She has grown as a person in all facets of life. She more compassionate, intelligent, wise, sociable, and actionable! I see people suffering with uneffective treatment. For more detail on CONSUMMO, kindly visit this blog:, And if you have used this medicine in the past, I will advice you create an awareness to help others, because, every family that has a mentally ill patient are battling unimaginable pain. The ultimate value of life depends upon awareness. Thank you

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