Skip to main content

CHANGE: How to Release Old Ways?!

The last few days have been rough for me, however, I have not had the need to take my anxiety medication again- yay!- and my state of well-being is improving by writing regularly, and recognizing that I have the support of my therapist, family, friends and fellow bloggers. I still get tired easily and feel concerned with all the things I want to do for myself, family, the nonprofit I serve, and other mental health related projects; despite the plan I came up with my therapist to relieve and manage my stress. I will read a little more than usual to help relax, and make sure I take a nap today.

A friend of mine said to be gentle with yourself. I used to think I was superwoman and was not fragile- my opinion on this matter has changed... I am fragile and do need to be gentle with myself, I just need to learn how to master this change.

Change is difficult for me because its a change in my thinking and lifestyle, and I'm the type of person that is a creature of habit and stay in my comfort zone. I think a new setting will help me change- like getting a massage, visiting the bookstore often, and surrounding myself with like-minded friends. I recognize I need to get out of my comfort zone- and fast! Now that I have a vision of the change I want, how do I get there?

How have you made a lifestyle change? How long did it take you to (ex. lose weight, stick to a strict diet, take your medication regularly, or to just relax more if you are used to overworking yourself, etc.?). 

To learn more about schizophrenia visit Embracing My Mind, NAMI, Choices in Recovery, or Schizophrenia Society of Nova Scotia (Canada).

Comments

Momofthree said…
Merry Christmas! Yes change is hard for me. I think I get stuck in a pattern - good or bad, it's a pattern I'm comfortable with; even if I hate things about it, It is what I already know, hence the term "comfort zone". And for me breaking away from the familiar is SCARY, yes I'm a wimp! Even when the past comfort zone was very destructive, negative, life-threatening even. But it's what I KNEW ALREADY! So my choice was1) Do I stay in a horrible, unhappy,physically abusive place OR. 2)Do I take the chance that something else in life might be better! Which "fearful thing" do I choose? I chose the chance that it might get better by stepping out of the known "horrible". And I'm glad I did. I set very small goals! Day 1: call 1 friend Day 2: call a counselor Day 3 wash my hair! Day 4: go talk to the counselor! Day 5: Celebrate making my goals by staying in pj's and watching funny movies! NEW is always harder, a learning curve, but it CAN be better! Set your goals, break them down to teency bits, then treat each teency bit as a victory! Because it is. It is PROGRESS! God bless, Cindy
Anonymous said…
It helps me to think about my challenges and how to overcome them. For example, I know that my medication compliance goes down if I don't have water nearby. I usually keep a bottle of water by my pillbox. This has helped a lot.
I also like what Cindy said about breaking the goal into teency pieces. Also, remember that it is difficult to change a habit, even for people without a mental health diagnosis! Remembering that helps me to be more patient with myself.

Popular posts from this blog

Lack of Trust: A Byproduct of My Mental Illness

In this entry, I'll share my experiences with Schizophrenia in regards to feeling lack of trust in others, paranoia, and isolation.... I remember my many episodes with Schizophrenia where I felt uneasy because of lack of trust in others. In the past, isolation was a giant bullying me around. Sometimes my mind would take me to a place of fear, hurt, and an unsettling spirit, which started with what seemed like a strange look, or a different feeling around an individual, when in reality it was another symptom of my undiagnosed illness- paranoia. My paranoia was rampant and dictated my life prior to experiencing a crisis, which led me to jail and into forced treatment and to receive an official diagnosis of Schizophrenia in 2007. In other words, my illness created enemies in my mind. For instance, I once believed my favorite kin was against me and I felt like she wanted me to fail, and I eventually thought she was conspiring to harm me. However, she never said anything to imply thes

Fear to Openness about Medication

I am concerned that I may be slipping into depression that may get worse if untreated. Prior to the birth of my child I never had a bout with depression, but as my body changed so did my hormones and my susceptibility to depression. A few months ago I was diagnosed with postpartum depression and at the time I knew I needed extra support from my my treatment team. I knew I needed to focus on my mental health because my anxiety level was up and down, it was difficult to concentrate, and I felt extremely overwhelmed and afraid my mental illness would rear its ugly head and try to destroy my recovery accomplishments. I spoke my therapist who contacted my doctor and let them know I was coming in the next morning as a walk-in, which I did and we tweaked my medication. Now, its hard to focus and to carry out minor assignments, sometimes I feel anxious for no reason, I am extremely tired and sleep more than usual, and I feel like I am on a downward spiral. Yet, I have reason to be. I have

Identical Twins and Schizophrenia

Did you know that both identical twins usually do not develop schizophrenia. Schizophrenia, or any other mental illness, is not developed solely by genes alone, other factors contribute to its development. Identical twins prove this theory, one could develop schizophrenia and the other does not develop a mental illness, this is said to be discordant. Discordant illness in twins is more common than concordant, or both twins having a mental illness. However, it is clear that bad parenting or a dysfunctional family is not one of the factors to develop schizophrenia. "Schizophrenia is caused by a genetic vulnerability coupled with environmental and psychosocial stressors, the so-called diathesis-stress model(http://www.schizophrenia.com/research/surg.general.2002.htm)". Complications prior to birth, or after birth, contribute to the likelihood of getting schizophrenia. Also, the underclass is more prone to developing schizophrenia than the upperclass, because the underclass is